18 hours ago
263,792 notes

magebird:

corpseheiress:

If you have suffered a tragedy and someone says, “you’re in my prayers” with sincerity, and you respond with some egotistical shit about being atheist you are an emotionally inept moron.

For real though, like think about it. If someone is religious, there’s really no kinder sentiment they can express than appealing to the highest power they know for your recovery. Whether or not you think it “works” is irrelevant— the kindness is absolutely real.

1 day ago
65,529 notes
frenchinhalechanelxoxo:

lmfao i’m done

frenchinhalechanelxoxo:

lmfao i’m done

Missandei of Naath

5 days ago
142,292 notes

darnni:

Best moment in history

lil’ kim promoting her sophomore album on the howard stern show in 2000.

Candice on the set of the 100th episode [x]

1 week ago
605 notes

progression of Eric’s relationship with Bill through names he calls him with

1 week ago
1,763 notes

dabaddestbitch:

REAL Bitch Shit 101

dabaddestbitch:

howtobeafuckinglady:

Today a QUEEN was born

She looked so good here tho

dabaddestbitch:

howtobeafuckinglady:

Today a QUEEN was born

She looked so good here tho

1 week ago
853 notes
dresdencodak:

People can be oversensitive, sure, and I think a lot of social justice/outrage on the internet is completely overblown and mostly the product of very young people forming an identity around being offended or being offended on behalf of other people. Self-righteousness of this kind is a lazy kind of behavior done in the place of being legitimately socially conscious. Reblogging or retweeting something someone said and repeatedly calling them a bigot is not the same thing as actually raising public awareness about an issue or (ideally) working to solve it.
On the other hand, that doesn’t in any way mean there isn’t a massive amount of horrible, hurtful things being said by people everywhere, and that there isn’t a huge amount of the public mindset that has some screwed up ideas of how to treat people. Every thoughtful human being has a moral obligation to combat bigotry and all forms of intolerance, but the way you combat bigotry is extremely important. Doing it incorrectly or for the wrong reasons can make matters worse.
How do you strike the balance? Here’s my rule of thumb: Before saying something, ask yourself: am I doing this to realistically change the mind of this person or others’, or am I doing this to show how much more progressive I am? Nothing’s more venomous than attacking someone simply to assert your place in a subculture, even if it’s a subculture of activism. It’s important to always think pragmatically: if what you’re about to say/type/do seems like it’s more about making your feel better, you should rethink how you’re doing it. Lashing out or even mildly nitpicking can potentially hurt what you’re actually trying to accomplish.
The purpose of calling out hurtful language, etc is to ultimately change human behavior for the better. Anything you do without that goal in mind has the potential to be toxic. Don’t release more hate into the world, it’s the opposite of what you set out to do.

dresdencodak:

People can be oversensitive, sure, and I think a lot of social justice/outrage on the internet is completely overblown and mostly the product of very young people forming an identity around being offended or being offended on behalf of other people. Self-righteousness of this kind is a lazy kind of behavior done in the place of being legitimately socially conscious. Reblogging or retweeting something someone said and repeatedly calling them a bigot is not the same thing as actually raising public awareness about an issue or (ideally) working to solve it.

On the other hand, that doesn’t in any way mean there isn’t a massive amount of horrible, hurtful things being said by people everywhere, and that there isn’t a huge amount of the public mindset that has some screwed up ideas of how to treat people. Every thoughtful human being has a moral obligation to combat bigotry and all forms of intolerance, but the way you combat bigotry is extremely important. Doing it incorrectly or for the wrong reasons can make matters worse.

How do you strike the balance? Here’s my rule of thumb: Before saying something, ask yourself: am I doing this to realistically change the mind of this person or others’, or am I doing this to show how much more progressive I am? Nothing’s more venomous than attacking someone simply to assert your place in a subculture, even if it’s a subculture of activism. It’s important to always think pragmatically: if what you’re about to say/type/do seems like it’s more about making your feel better, you should rethink how you’re doing it. Lashing out or even mildly nitpicking can potentially hurt what you’re actually trying to accomplish.

The purpose of calling out hurtful language, etc is to ultimately change human behavior for the better. Anything you do without that goal in mind has the potential to be toxic. Don’t release more hate into the world, it’s the opposite of what you set out to do.

theme